Indiana State University. Department of Advanced Practice Nursing | Cunningham Memorial Library Special Collections

Name: Indiana State University. Department of Advanced Practice Nursing


Historical Note:

The Department of Advanced Practice Nursing at Indiana State University admitted its first students in 1986. It has maintained continuous accreditation by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission, Inc. since 1989. The master’s program prepares nurses for advanced nursing practice in three concentrations. A graduate of the family nurse practitioner concentration utilizes a comprehensive approach to meet the diversified and holistic health needs of individuals, families, groups, and communities. The graduate of the nursing education concentration is prepared to design, provide, and evaluate educational offerings as nurse faculty for university nursing programs, healthcare settings, community groups, and secondary education health career courses.  A nursing administration concentration graduate is prepared and develops a cadre of nurse administrator and executive skills to assume first-line and middle management, and leadership roles in diverse health care organizational settings.

All courses and practica are offered via web-based distance learning. Students must complete a master’s thesis (six credits), an evidence-based practice project, or a culminating project.

A post-master’s certificate is offered in two of the master’s concentrations. The family nurse practitioner certificate is available for master’s prepared nurses with either a prior master of arts or master of science degree with a focus in nursing, or nurse practitioner specialization in another area, who wish to obtain family nurse practitioner education. Courses are designed with variable clinical hours, on an individual basis, depending upon previous nursing education and specialization. The nursing education certificate is available for master’s prepared nurses to obtain specialization as a nurse educator.

Graduates who complete the master’s degree with a major in nursing or post-master’s certificate in the family nurse practitioner concentration are eligible to apply for national certification testing through the American Nurses Credentialing Center or American Academy of Nurse Practitioners. Those who complete the master’s degree with a major in nursing or post-master’s certificate in the nursing education concentration are eligible to apply for the National League for Nursing nurse educator certification. Depending upon experience, graduates who complete the master’s degree with a major in nursing with a concentration in nursing administration are eligible for certification through the American Nurses Credentialing Center.

Indiana State University’s Doctor of Nursing Practice Program (D.N.P.) is a practice-focused doctoral program. The goal of the Post-Master’s D.N.P. Program is to prepare expert nurse clinicians and leaders to improve health and health care outcomes through evidence-based practice in rural and diverse clinical, health care, and academic settings. This program’s aim is to provide educational experiences in a interdisciplinary collaborative learning environment, with an embedded scholarly project experience that emphasizes evidence-based approaches for quality and safety improvement in various roles and practice settings and provides students with interactive mentorship by clinical and faculty experts. The ISU D.N.P. Program will emphasize innovative and evidence-based nursing practice, applying research processes to decision making, and translating credible research findings to increase the effectiveness of both direct and indirect nursing practice. Scholarly projects focused on rural or underserved populations are of special interest and encouraged. The 39-credit D.N.P. Program offers two tracks of study:  a post-family nurse pracitioner option as the clinical (N.P.) track, or a post-nursing administration master’s option as the nurse executive (N.E.) track.  Both D.N.P. tracks are offered in an all-on-line format designed for the busy working professional. The program can be completed in five-six semesters of full-time study. Part-time study will be offered on a space-available basis, but the student is advised that the decision to pursue part-time study will lengthen the time to degree completion. The number of applicants admitted to the D.N.P. Program is limited to 20 new students each fall semester. Meeting the minimum admission criteria does not ensure that applicants will be admitted to the program.

Sources: 2011-2012 ISU Graduate Catalog



Powered by Archon Version 3.21 rev-1
Copyright ©2012 The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign